Yes: the Eureka Stockade, 1854, was a terrorist event by our contemporary legal standards.  The current definition of “terrorist act” is set out below.  It’s complex, but the bottom line is this: if an ordinary criminal act of damage to property or person is carried out in order to intimidate the government or the public, it is a terrorist act.  The Eureka Stockade involved fairly serious criminal conduct: 30 people were killed. and it was explicitly for political purposes: they wanted to force the Victorian government to allow miners (who paid high mining licence fees) to vote.  Their sentiment was part of the idea expressed 81 years earlier in America: the Boston tea party of 1773 and then the American war of independence were clear expressions of the sentiment: no taxation without representation.

The leaders were charged with high treason, but they were acquitted.  this was generally regarded as an expression of public sympathy for their cause.  One of them, Peter Lalor went on to be Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Council (upper House) in 1880.

The diggers swore an oath on 30 November 1854: ‘We swear by the Southern Cross to stand truly by each other and fight to defend our rights and liberties’

The Commonwealth Criminal Code Act (1995) defines”terrorist act” in section 100.1.  You can see the full version here.  Here is an abbreviated version:

“terrorist act means an action where:

(a) the action falls within subsection (2)…and
(b) the action is done with the intention of:

(i) coercing, or influencing by intimidation, the government of the Commonwealth or a State, Territory or foreign country, or of part of a State, Territory or foreign country; or
(ii) intimidating the public or a section of the public.

(2)       Action falls within this subsection if it:

(a)       causes serious harm that is physical harm to a person; or
(b)       causes serious damage to property; or
(c)       causes a person’s death; or …”

However it will not be a terrorist act if it falls within sub-section 3:

“(3)       Action falls within this subsection if it:

(a)       is advocacy, protest, dissent or industrial action; and
(b)       is not intended:

(i)        to cause serious harm that is physical harm to a person; or
(ii)       to cause a person’s death; or …”

 It is a nice historical irony that another icon of Australian history is also bound up in terrorism. Ian Jones, the foremost authority on Ned Kelly, says Kelly’s activities in North-East Victoria had the ultimate objective of establishing a separate colony in that area.  Kelly’s Jerilderie Letter adds credence to that suggestion.  If his objective was a political one, then his murderous exploits fit him neatly into the modern legal definition of a terrorist.